Godolphin by Edward Bulwer Lytton

Автор: andrey4444. Опубликовано в Эдуард Бульвер-Литтон

The novel "Godolphin" opens with a dying man named John Vernon is relaying his dying wishes to his daughter, Constance. John Vernon is an ex-politician who was betrayed by the Whigs, thus losing his fortune. Just before he dies he makes the thirteen-year-old daughter, Constance, swear an oath to marry a high-class powerful man in order to seek revenge on his old political party. After her father’s death Constance moves in with a wealthy distant relative, Lady Erpingham.

Table of Contents:

TO COUNT ALFRED D'ORSAY. MY DEAR COUNT D'ORSAY
PREFACE TO GODOLPHIN
CHAPTER I.
The death-bed of John Vernon — His dying words — Description of his daughter, the heroine — The oath.
CHAPTER II.
Remark on the tenure of life — The coffins of great men seldom neglected — Constance takes refuge with Lady Erpingham — The heroine's accomplishments and character — The manoeuvring temperament.
CHAPTER III.
The hero introduced to our reader's notice — Dialogue between himself and his father — Percy Godolphin's character as a boy — The catastrophe of his school life.
CHAPTER IV.
Percy's first adventure as a free agent.
CHAPTER V.
The mummers — Godolphin in love — The effect of Fanny Millinger's acting upon him — The two offers —Godolphin quits the players.
CHAPTER VI.
Percy Godolphin the guest of Saville — He enters tho Life-Guards, and becomes the fashion.
CHAPTER VII
Saville excused for having human affections — Godolphin sees one whom he never sees again — The new actress.
CHAPTER VIII.
Godolphin's passion for the stage — The difference it engendered in his habits of life.
CHAPTER IX.
The legacy — A new deformity in Saville — The nature of worldly liaisons — Godolphin leaves England.
CHAPTER X.
The education of Constance's mind.
CHAPTER XI.
Conversation between Lady Erpingham and Constance — Further particulars of Godolphin's family, etc.
CHAPTER XII.
Description of Godolphin's house — The first interview — Its effect on Constance.
CHAPTER XIII.
A ball announced — Godolphin's visit to Wendover Castle — His manners and conversation.
CHAPTER XIV.
Conversation between Godolphin and Constance — The country life and the town life.
CHAPTER XV.
The feelings of Constance and Godolphin toward each other — The distinction in their characters — Remarks on the effects produced by the world upon Godolphin — The ride — Rural descriptions — Omens — The first indistinct confession.
CHAPTER XVI.
Godolphin's return home — His soliloquy — Lord Erpingham's arrival at Wendover Castle — The earl described — His account of Godolphin's life at Rome.
CHAPTER XVII.
Constance at her toilet — Her feelings — Her character of beauty described—The ball—The Duchess of Winstoun and lier daughter — An induction from the nature of female rivalries — Jealousy in a lover — Impertinence retorted — Listeners never hear good of themselves — Remarks on the amusements of a publio assembly — The supper — The falseness of seeming gaiety — Various reflections, new and true — What passes between Godolphin and Constance.
CHAPTER XVIII.
The interview — The crisis of a life.
CHAPTER XIX.
A rare and exquisite of the best (worst) school — A conversation on a thousand matters — The declension of the "sui profusus" into the "alieni appetens".
CHAPTER XX.
Fanny Millinger once more — Love — Woman — Books — A hundred topics touched on the surface — Godolphin's state of mind more minutely examined — The dinner at Saville's.
CHAPTER XXI.
An event of great importance to the principal actors in this history — Godolphin a second time leaves England.
CHAPTER XXII.
The bride alone — A dialogue political and matrimonial — Constance's genius for diplomacy — The character of her assemblies — Her conquest over Lady Delville.
CHAPTER XXIII.
An insight into the real grand monde; — being a search behind the rose-colored curtains.
CHAPTER XXIV.
The married state of Constance.
CHAPTER XXV.
The pleasure of retaliating humiliation — Constance's defense of fashion — Remarks on fashion — Godolphin's whereabout — Fanny Millinger's character of herself — Want of courage in moralists.
CHAPTER XXVI.
The visionary and his daughter — An Englishman, such as foreigners imagine the English.
CHAPTER XXVII.
A conversation little appertaining to the nineteenth century — Researches into human fate — The prediction.
CHAPTER XXVIII.
The youth of Lucilla Volktman — A mysterious conversation — The return of one unlooked for.
CHAPTER XXIX.
The effect of years and experience — The Italian character.
CHAPTER XXX.
Magnetism — Sympathy — The return of elements to elements.
CHAPTER XXXI.
A Scene — Lucilla's strange conduct — Godolphin passes through a severe ordeal — Egeria's Grotto, and what there happens.
CHAPTER XXXII.
The weakness of all virtue springing only from the feelings.
CHAPTER XXXIII.
Return to Lady Erpingham — Lady Erpingham falls ill — Lord Erpingham resolves to go abroad — Plutarch upon musical instruments — Party at Erpingham House — Saville on society and the taste for the little — David Mandeville — Women, their influence and education — The necessity of an object — Religion.
CHAPTER XXXIV.
Ambition vindicated — The home of Godolphin and Lucilla — Lucilla's mind — The effect of happy love on female talent — The eve of farewell — Lucilla alone — Test of a woman's affection.
CHAPTER XXXV.
Godolphin at Rome — The cure for a morbid idealism — His embarrassment in regard to Lucilla — The rencontre with an old friend — The Colosseum — A surprise.
CHAPTER XXXVI.
Dialogue between Godolphin and Saville — Certain events explained — Saville's apology for a bad heart — Godolphin's confused sentiments for Lady Erpingham.
CHAPTER XXXVII.
An evening with Constance.
CHAPTER XXXVIII.
Constance's undiminished love for Godolphin — Her remorse and her hope — The Capitol — The different thoughts of Godolphin and Constance at the view — The tender expressions of Constance.
CHAPTER XXXIX.
Lucilla's letter — The effect it produces on Godolphin.
CHAPTER XL.
Tivoli — The Siren's Cave — The confession.
CHAPTER XLI.
Lucilla — The solitude — The spell — The dream and the resolve.
CHAPTER XLII.
Joy and despair.
CHAPTER XLIII.
Love strong as death, and not less bitter.
CHAPTER XLIV.
Godolphin.
CHAPTER XLV.
The declaration — The approaching nuptials — Is the idealist contented?
CHAPTER XLVI.
The bridals — The accident — The first lawful possession of love.
CHAPTER XLVII.
News of Lucilla.
CHAPTER XLVIII.
In which two persons, permanently united, discover that no tie can produce union of minds.
CHAPTER XLIX.
The return to London — The eternal nature of disappointment — Fanny Millinger — Her house and supper.
CHAPTER L.
Godolphin's soliloquy — He becomes a man of pleasure and a patron of the arts — A new character shadowed forth; for as we advance, whether in life or its representation, characters are more faint and dimly drawn than in the earlier part of our career.
CHAPTER LI.
Godolphin's course of life — Influence of opinion and of ridicule on the minds of privileged orders — Lady Erpingham's friendship with George IV. — His manner of living.
CHAPTER LII.
Radclyffe and Godolphin converse — The varieties of ambition.
CHAPTER LIII.
Fanny behind the scenes — Reminiscences of youth — The universality of trick — The supper at Fanny Millinger's — Talk on a thousand matters, equally light and true — Fanny's song.
CHAPTER LIV.
The career of Constance — Real state of her feelings toward Godolphin — Rapid succession of political events — Canning's administration — Catholic Question — Lord Grey's speech — Canning's death.
CHAPTER LV.
The death of George IV. — The political situation of parties, and of Lady Erpingham.
CHAPTER LVI.
The roue has become a valetudinarian — News — A fortuneteller.
CHAPTER LVII.
Superstition — Its wonderful effects.
CHAPTER LVIII.
The empire of time and of love — The proud Constance grown weak and humble — An ordeal.
CHAPTER LIX.
Constance makes a discovery that touches and enlightens her as to Godolphin's nature — An event, although in private life, not without its interest.
CHAPTER LX.
The Reform Bill — A very short chapter.
CHAPTER LXI.
The soliloquy of the soothsayer — An episodical mystery, introduced as a type of the many things in life that are never accounted for — Gratuitous deviations from our common career.
CHAPTER LXII.
In which the common life glides into the strange — Equally true, but the truth not equally acknowledged.
CHAPTER LXIII.
A meeting between Constance and the prophetess.
CHAPTER LXIV.
Lucilla's flight — The perplexity of Lady Erpingham — A change comes over Godolphin's mind — His conversation with Radclyffe — General election — Godolphin becomes a senator.
CHAPTER LXV.
New views of a privileged order — The death-bed of Augustus Saville.
CHAPTER LXVI.
The journey and the surprise — A walk in the summer night — The stars, and the association that memory makes with nature.
CHAPTER LXVII.
The full renewal of love — Happiness produces fear, "and in to-day already walks to-morrow".
CHAPTER LXVIII.
The last conversation between Godolphin and Constance — His thoughts and solitary walk amid the scenes of his youth — The letter — The departure.
CHAPTER THE LAST.
A dread meeting — The storm — The catastrophe.

 

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